Summer 2020 Undergraduate Courses

School of Business Summer 2020 undergraduate courses are open to all Wake Forest students. You may register now via WIN. If you are unable to register for this course, please contact Whitney Milhouse (milhouw@wfu.edu).

BEM 221: Principles of Marketing (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM | Online, Herbst

Investigates the means by which firms create, maintain, and improve relationships with customers through the development of strong brands and effective marketing programs. Emphasizes the application, rather than the acquisition, of marketing knowledge. Explores how the four Ps (product, price, place, and promotion) can be used to solve problems, exploit opportunities, and meet challenges in the global marketplace. Discussions, cases, objective tests, in-class exercises, and a marketing campaign project are among the instructional methods used.

In this course, using business cases, we will study and discuss the importance of marketing across several facets of a business. Throughout the course, you will have a better understanding of what marketers must consider when attempting to generate market demand for a product. We will dive into understanding why consumers buy, what makes them buy, and how we can enhance the perceptions of our brands to make them more likely to be purchased. You will quickly see that there is so much psychology (and other social sciences) in marketing! Open to all Wake Forest students.

By the end of the course, you will be able to do the following: Think critically about marketing issues that are in the headlines right now; explain the importance of gleaning marketing insights via sound marketing research; explain how the effective use of segmentation, targeting, and positioning can deliver the right product to the right consumer at the right time.

Learning Mode: Daily live meetings via Zoom; two exams and interim assignments.

BEM 251: Management Information Systems (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 8:00 AM – 9:15 PM | Online, Prestwood

Introduction to the business issues associated with information systems, designed to provide a broad perspective for utilizing and managing an organization’s information resources. Frameworks are presented for understanding the placement and relationship of different types of information systems within an organization. Includes an overview of computing technology currently used in business organizations, techniques for developing and implementing information systems, advanced applications of information technology, and the strategic implications of information systems and technology for business. Additionally students will learn practical Excel functionality, including PivotTables and VLOOKUPS, and gain experience using Tableau to turn data into interesting and compelling visualizations.

Learning Mode: At least 1 synchronous class meeting per week for class discussion of the case studies/articles/text readings, supplemented by asynchronous work.

BEM 325: Consumer Behavior (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Online, Herbst

We are all complex consumers, and our fickle nature makes it very difficult for marketers to predict our buying patterns, over time. In this course, using business cases and Dan Ariely’s book, Predictably Irrational, we will study and discuss the importance of understanding the psyche of the consumer.

This course focuses on understanding the customers/consumers/buyers/clients/patrons without whom marketing and business cannot survive. Examines consumer motivations, influences, decision-making processes and behaviors as they relate to the development of competitive marketing strategy. Discussions, cases, in-class exercises, and a project are among the instructional methods used in the course.

In this consumer behavior/consumer psychology course, you will learn how to tackle marketing challenges in which the psyche of the consumer needs to be carefully studied. Marketing (based, in part, on understanding consumer behavior and consumer psychology) is responsible for generating demand for products. If we do not do our jobs as marketers by building consumers’ desire to purchase our products, then our products will not succeed in the market. This course will help you learn what to consider in the way of consumer behavior/consumer psychology as you market a product. You will quickly see that there is so much psychology (and other social sciences) in consumer behavior!

By the end of the course, you will be able to do the following: Think critically about consumer behavior/consumer psychology issues that are in today’s headlines; appreciate the importance of understanding the ever-changing consumer psyche; understand the roles of digital marketing efforts on consumer behavior.

Learning Mode: Daily live meetings via Zoom; two exams and interim assignments.

BUS 281-A: Hands on Data Science with Python (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 9:30 AM  – 10:45 AM | Online, Ames

This is an intense and action-packed course for anyone interested in data science or pursuing a career in data science. This course has been designed to provide you a solid foundation in real-world Data Science and Machine Learning techniques. You will learn Python – no prior programing knowledge is necessary. You’ll get hands on experience using a variety of methods including CART, Random Forest, Gradient Boosting Machines (GBM) and others. Every week starts off with a dataset and a challenge to build the best predictive model. Along the way we’ll cover complete data science process of exploration, feature engineering, partitioning, model training, hyperparameter tuning, evaluation and explanation. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Two live meetings per week, combined with asynchronous material and weekly projects.

BUS 281-B: Accounting for Non-Business Students (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM | Online, Amoruso

A basic understanding of accounting is essential in the financial world, whether you are starting your own business or analyzing potential stock market investments. This course provides a survey of financial accounting. Topics covered include the financial statements, the accounting equation, transaction analysis, the accounting process, differences between the cash and accrual bases of accounting, presentation and analysis of key balance sheet elements, and financial statement analysis. This course is designed to be accessible to students from all academic disciplines, so no prior training in business or economics is required. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Course materials will generally be delivered asynchronously, with between one and three live sessions per week (via Zoom) for Q&A and discussion.

BUS 281-C: Wrongs, Rights and Resilience: Settlement as a Strategy in Business Litigation (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM | Online, Bliss

In the legal environment of business, enforcement actions, individual claims and even criminal prosecutions are often brought to disposition by settlement. This class offers insight into the dynamics that drive these forms of alternative dispute resolution in business. Students will deconstruct real legal documents from real cases to examine their rationale, reach and impact. There is no text book for this course. Materials will consist of selected readings and curated public resources such as Financial Statements, Court documents and Settlement Agreements. Study teams will produce a final summary and analysis. You will finish this course with an increased confidence in your ability to understand the language of the law using a skill set born of experience and a practical, professional perspective. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Small group discussions with the instructor via WebEx, supplemented with asynchronous study.

BUS 281-D: Why Be Good? (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Online, Cianci

This critical thinking course seeks to help students discover and develop their own ethical philosophy by a thoughtful and in-depth evaluation of the question, “Why be good?” Although we will briefly touch upon topics covered in most ethics texts and courses, such as ethical decision-making models, organizational and individual factors that impact such decision making, and case studies of ethical failings, this course will bring those topics to life by exploring what you believe and why. In this course, you will work individually and in teams to: briefly review moral philosophies (from text, moral exemplars, and guest speakers); communicate and critically evaluate your own and others’ thoughts, assumptions, and beliefs regarding various ethical issues; and most importantly; develop your thinking and rationale for your own ethical views with the goal of leaving this class with a deeper and more coherent understanding of what you believe and why. With a personal ethical philosophy rooted in a coherent, cohesive rationale for “why be good?,” students will be more likely to adhere to espoused ethical principles when confronted with obstacles or incentives to violate those principles (e.g., Why be good when no one is watching? Why be good when being good is inconvenient or unpopular or costly?). This course will be the beginning of a life-long journey to evaluate and re-evaluate this critical question as academic, professional, and personal life experiences challenge, strengthen, and transform one’s ethicality. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: This course will consist of two to three synchronous live WebEx class meetings per week, with the remaining class periods being held asynchronously.

BUS 281-E: Managing the Family Enterprise (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM | Online, Dickson

Focuses on the unique nature, challenges and opportunities of owning, managing or joining a family-owned enterprise. The class explores the strategic, financial, interpersonal and operational issues that are present in family enterprises and provides students with knowledge and skills necessary for navigating both the challenge and promise of the family business.

If you are currently active in a family business, plan on joining your family’s business in the future, founding your own family business or consulting with family businesses, this course will provide you with critical information and skills for success. Similar to many companies, family enterprises must contend with increasingly fierce and global competition, external crises and an often uncertain future. To be successful family enterprises must find ways to leverage the unique nature of family ownership and involvement to meet these challenges. The class goes beyond theory to practice by incorporating case studies of family enterprises and a family enterprise simulation. Class participants will also have the opportunity to learn directly from successful family business owners and consultants. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Live class sessions will be conducted each Monday and Wednesday; asynchronous sessions will be scheduled for Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Live sessions will focus on applying key concepts and will be led by the instructor and supplemented with virtual visits by successful family business owners and advisors.

BUS 281-F: Healthcare and Biomedical Innovation in the Coronavirus Era (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM | Online, Joshi

Why does it take so long to bring new life-saving treatments and therapies to market and how should we rethink this process in the face of a global pandemic? The rapidly emerging Era of the Coronavirus has profound implications for accelerating and advancing the role of healthcare and biomedical innovation in saving lives around the world. This course provides aspiring leaders in business, economics, education, engineering, law, medicine, government, and public policy with an overview of the strategic issues associated with innovation management, intellectual property (IP) protection, and new product development in healthcare settings in for-profit and non-profit organizations. Through the use of conceptual frameworks, relevant case studies, interactive simulations, and product/service examples drawn from the global healthcare ecosystem, students will explore the effective use of IP to reduce and manage risk, facilitate market entry, and enhance competitive positioning. Special emphasis will be placed on examining the strategic, ethical, legal, and regulatory aspects of decision-making and crisis management in the context of healthcare experimentation, clinical trials, and product introductions. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: The class will meet synchronously two to three times per week, with supplemental asynchronous sessions. Synchronous sessions will feature an interactive simulation, as well as case discussions. Concept quizzes, discussion forums, and individual final case analysis report.

BUS 281-G: Topics in Commercial/Residential Real Estate (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM | Online, Lewallen

Examines the basic principles of real estate with a primary focus on commercial real estate. Key topics related to residential real estate will also be covered. Students will learn about the various types of real estate, legal forms of real estate ownership, basic real estate math, buying and selling real estate, valuation of real estate, real estate development, real estate as a career and more. The course will also focus on the entrepreneurial side of real estate. International Real Estate Topics will also be discussed. Current events will be discussed as they relate to the course materials. Real estate touches everyone. Understanding the basics of real estate will serve you well in whatever career path you choose. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Combination of synchronous meetings and asynchronous work. Learning methods include expert guest lectures, cases, class projects and discussion; both individual and team work will be graded.

BUS 281-H: International Entrepreneurship Strategies (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM | Online, Lewallen

Have you dreamed of starting your own International Business? This course gives students with global entrepreneurship aspirations a chance to learn how to strategically evaluate and embark on a new venture or join an innovative, entrepreneurial business. The course is for students interested in starting, joining, or expanding international ventures. It examines dimensions affecting entrepreneurship, including modes of entry (direct selling, franchising, internet), economic, and formal/informal institutions. This course combines independent flexible study modules and projects combined with once a week live (synchronous) sessions via WebEx. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Combination of synchronous meetings and asynchronous work.

BUS 281-I: Problem Solving Skills and Frameworks (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Online, McKeen

The goal of this course is to develop the problem-solving skills that management consultants and general managers use through their careers. The course will teach several frameworks and methodologies that are applicable to a wide range of business problems. The core problem-solving methodology is the same as that used by major strategy consulting firms. You will be taught how to use these methods and frameworks as tools to solve multi-faceted business problems that you will be presented with in class. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning objectives are to build skills in three areas critical to success in business and management: • Using fact-based analysis to solve complex business problems efficiently and effectively • Communicating your answer to business problems persuasively • Creating teams that utilize each member’s strengths and tap group synergies

Learning Mode: A combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning.

BUS 281-J: Sales and Sales Management (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM | Online, McKeen

This course will provide a practical understanding of sales and the selling process. Every business has a sales function. Understanding how sales supports a company’s go-to-market strategy and how sales is changing can lead to business success. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: A combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning.

BUS 281-K: The Psychology of Personal Financial Management and Decision-Making (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Online, Montague

This course provides students with the basic psychology behind the managing of their personal finances, independent living, and financial well-being. Focuses on basic financial life skills such as personal banking, cash budgeting, purchasing, financing, and investing decisions through the lens of the psychological biases that can potentially lead to suboptimal financial decisions. Students will also learn how to leverage business tools (e.g., Excel and PowerPoint) to facilitate their ability to summarize, manage, communicate and make high quality decisions involving financial information. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Online with asynchronous and synchronous components. Deliverables will include quizzes, discussion boards, reflection papers and PowerPoint presentations.

BUS 281-L: Streaming the Law (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July2 | 10:50 AM – 12:05 PM | Online, Phillips and Starrett

The law is all around us, setting the boundaries for our daily expectations of everything we do and everyone we see. And the law is ubiquitous in popular culture too; many popular television shows implicate or attempt to address head-on how the law works in our lives. But are they accurate? In this course, we’ll unpack some of the legal issues in popular hits like The Office, The West Wing, Friends, and others. We’ll watch select television clips or episodes to identify legal issues, read background resources to learn the baseline legal rules, and examine additional resources to discuss and understand why and how the law developed, resulting in a deep and thorough understanding of how the law enables and regulates business. Most importantly, we’ll learn how business professionals can shape their own behavior and plans to navigate the law successfully. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Student readings with outside assignments with asynchronous introductions and interpretive aids. Two live sessions each week: a Q&A session on the foundational readings and a student-led discussion. Graded work includes ongoing discussion forum contributions, as well as a summary paper.

BUS 281-M: Personal Finance for Everyone (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Online, Young and Shipe

College graduation is an event you will never forget – and then life hits you like a ton of bricks! “Why do I get so little of my paycheck?” “Where does the money go every month?” “What is the stock market?” “How do I start investing?” “What is a budget?” “How do I pay back all these student loans?” This course is designed to set you on a path to a life of financial empowerment and freedom without any previous financial knowledge. We will cover financial planning, budgeting, credit cards, investing, income taxes, financial markets, insurance, purchasing a home or car, and many other must-know topics. While these topics apply to people of all ages, we will focus on the specific needs of young adults without any financial background. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: The class will be split between synchronous and asynchronous content. Asynchronous lectures will be combined with two to three synchronous meetings per week for exercises, sharing of work, and Q&A.

BUS 281-N: The Business of Platforms: Strategy and Innovation in the Digital Era (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM | Online, Anderson

Platform businesses that bring together consumers and third-party content producers (e.g., Apple iPhone, Amazon Marketplace, and Airbnb) are transforming competition. Firms that compete as platform providers are some of the most successful firms in the 21st century. This course will explore what makes a platform business distinctly different from a traditional product or service business. Students will learn about a range of platform businesses, how they foster innovative ideas, and the governance challenges wildly successful platform businesses often face. While exploring numerous examples, students will learn how to evaluate value creation and value capture from the perspective of multiple actors within the platform ecosystem. This course is for a wide range of participants: those with entrepreneurial aspirations, those looking to work for a company that competes in a platform ecosystem, and those simply curious about why platform businesses are such an integral part of our everyday lives. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: 2-3 synchronous sessions per week, which will feature discussions of mini cases and recent articles from business press; supplemented by additional asynchronous learning opportunities.

BUS 281-O: Leadership for the 21st Century: Transformational Leadership and Driving Performance with Integrity (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 10:50 AM – 12:05 PM | Online, Hannah

The world is becoming increasingly more dynamic, complex, and interconnected. Effective leaders who can establish visions for the future and build, inspire and guide diverse and motivated teams toward that future are needed now more than ever in business, not-for-profit, government and community organizations. This course will provide students numerous opportunities to form a personal philosophy as a leader of character, and learn knowledge, skills, and abilities to lead others to achieve results and to build effective and cohesive teams that are guided by strong values and a sense of purpose. The course will be based on cutting edge concepts from both research and the practice of leadership and will utilize numerous cases, simulations, readings, simulations, and guest speakers to practice leadership and apply the knowledge learned. As ethics and values are at the heart of leadership and gaining trust and credibility, the course will also integrate ethical leadership into the learnings. Ultimately this course will prepare students to gain personal and organizational success as a leader. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: The course will be approximately 50% synchronous, 25% asynchronous in self-directed learning and 25% asynchronous in team work. There will be a minimum of one live synchronous meeting with the instructor per week, as well as team meetings and exercises.

BUS 281-P: Personal and Team Development (3 credit hours)

May 27 – July 2 | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM | Online, Wayne

No matter one’s profession, people must be able to manage and motivate themselves and work well with others, often as part of a team. The purpose of this course is to develop students to maximize their success and satisfaction as individuals and team members. The course will focus on personal development including enhancing self-awareness (Who am I- my personality, emotions, passions, goals, etc., and how do they affect how I show up- my attitudes and performance?) and self-management (time, energy, and stress management, resilience, growth vs. fixed mindset, self-regulating behavior to high performance and goal achievement). The course will also provide students the knowledge and skills to work effectively in teams by focusing on the importance of teams, foundations of teamwork such as goals, roles, norms; team decision-making and creativity; mastering conflict; generating commitment and accountability; paying attention to results; leveraging team strengths and diversity, etc.). This course is intended for non-business students who want to develop these valuable personal and team skills. Open to all Wake Forest students. Does not count toward a School of Business major or concentration.

Learning Mode: Two synchronous class sessions each week, small group synchronous lab sessions; supplemented by asynchronous work. Deliverables include student readiness assessments and a team project.